Endocrine-Disrupting Chemicals: Health Threat Grows

After reviewing hundreds of peer-reviewed scientific studies researches have concluded that a growing number of chemicals in pesticides, flame retardants, and certain plastics have been linked to widespread health problems including infertility, diabetes, and impaired brain development.  Exposure to certain chemicals found in industrial and household goods has also been linked in new studies to obesity; to endometriosis, a painful and abnormal growth of tissue on the outside of the womb; and to polycystic ovary syndrome, a significant cause of infertility.

Gut Microbiome Affected by Toxic Chemicals in Products, Environment, Food

The microbes that inhabit our bodies are influenced by what we eat, drink, breathe and absorb through our skin, and most of us are chronically exposed to natural and human-made environmental contaminants.  In this study, scientists reviewed the research linking dozens of chemicals present in our personal care products, home care products, general environment and our food to changes in the gut microbiome and associated health challenges.

Tooth Decay Linked to Toxic Chemical PFAS: New Study

Scientific studies have demonstrated that PFAS is a toxic chemical and numerous adverse health consequences have been linked to it including some kinds of cancers (especially breast, testicular and prostate cancers), liver problems, heart disease, hormonal disruption, low birth weight and numerous other health problems including thyroid problems, high cholesterol, kidney problems, prostate problems and fertility problems.  Now, another adverse health consequence has been added to that list: tooth decay in children.

Consumer BPA Exposure Much Higher than Originally Thought

Using new direct testing methods, scientific experts on the chemical BPA have made a new discovery: Previous estimates of the levels of BPA consumers are exposed to each day have been based on flawed, inaccurate testing methods. The previous measurements and estimates that have been used by regulatory agencies–including the FDA**–have underestimated exposure levels by as much as 44 times. With new, more advanced methods*** scientists are now able to see that previous estimates of exposure to the endocrine-disrupting chemical are far greater than regulators and legislators believed when establishing guidelines for what is “safe” exposure levels for U.S. children and adults.

Chemicals in Sunscreen Seep into Your Bloodstream: FDA Study

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has just published the results of a pilot study conducted by FDA scientists in the Journal of American Medical Association’s JAMA Network that demonstrated four chemicals commonly used in commercial sunscreens seep into the bloodstream after just one day of use.

These two activities can lower your exposure to toxic chemicals in your home

New research on environmental chemicals reveals two activities that may actually lower your exposure to toxic flame retardant chemicals in … More