PFAS Forever Chemical Discovered in Bottled Water: Study

A new study sponsored by Consumer Reports and conducted by Johns Hopkins University researchers found PFAS chemicals in 39 out of more than 100 bottled waters tested.

States with New PFAS Laws

PFAS chemicals have among the strongest bonds in chemistry and at the present time there is no ‘death’ of these chemicals, meaning they do not break down over time, but appear they will live on “forever”.  PFAS chemicals are not regulated by the U.S. government so it is up to individual states to determine and regulate PFAS chemicals to protect their residents.  Many states are not addressing the PFAS problem, but some are. Here are some state laws being proposed or enacted to help protect state residents by at least minimizing exposure to the dangers of PFAS. 

Alarming levels of PFAS forever chemicals, arsenic and lead in US water

The results of a nine-month investigation reveal that millions of people in the U.S. continue to face serious water quality problems because of contamination, deteriorating infrastructure, and inadequate treatment at water plants. Included in that contamination were what has been called “alarming levels” of toxic PFAS “forever chemicals”, lead and arsenic.

The Problem with Lead

Problems with lead exposure in the U.S. are far more pervasive and far closer to home than many might think–namely, in the food we eat (leaching from food packaging containers), in cosmetics like lipstick, and lead in bottled water bought at the supermarket.  But the other problem with lead–why it still exists in our food, cosmetics and water–is a political one.  A group of organizations has recently sent a formal petition to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) urging the agency to revise its outdated standards for lead in food to better protect the public.