PFAS Manufacturer Blocks Testing for the Toxic ‘Forever’ Chemical

Uncovering where (and how much) of the environmental contaminant PFAS chemical is in products, food, soil, water and human bodies just became near impossible for research scientists.

The Problem with Lead

Problems with lead exposure in the U.S. are far more pervasive and far closer to home than many might think–namely, in the food we eat (leaching from food packaging containers), in cosmetics like lipstick, and lead in bottled water bought at the supermarket.  But the other problem with lead–why it still exists in our food, cosmetics and water–is a political one.  A group of organizations has recently sent a formal petition to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) urging the agency to revise its outdated standards for lead in food to better protect the public.

Our Most Toxic Chemical: Who is Doing What about PFAS?

What are the Effects of PFAS Chemical?   Because of their toxicity at extremely low concentrations, there are risks from PFAS bioaccumulation.  In addition to their presence in the human body–where, among other serious effects, they are linked with increased rates of some types of cancer, hormonal disruption, and immune responses–PFAS chemicals (a class of over 3000 compounds) are released into the environment, transported through groundwater, river, and soils, and can only be partially remediated. Scientists will be
meeting at the Geological Society of America’s 2020 Annual Meeting to learn more about this highly toxic chemical and discuss the need for more research.

Toxic Chemical in Drinking Water and Thyroid Problems: Bigger Threat than Previously Believed

Perchlorate, a chemical compound used in rocket fuels, fireworks, fertilizers, food packaging and many other industrial materials, seeps into  groundwater–the very source of our drinking water. Now scientists have discovered perchlorate presents far more of a threat to our thyroids than previously believed. Unfortunately, the U.S. government has just decided not to regulate the amount of this toxic chemical in our drinking water.