Breast Cancer Linked to Hair Dye, Straighteners: New NIH Study

NIH research reveals that women who use permanent hair dye and chemical hair straighteners have a higher risk of developing breast cancer than women who don’t use these products.

Deadly Cancer-Talcum Powder Link Just Got Stronger

New case study findings have strengthened the link between talcum powder, asbestos (which can be co-mingled with talc due to mining processes) and mesothelioma–a deadly cancer of the lining of organs (most often occurring in the lining around the lungs or the abdomen).

Exposure to Toxic Chemical Dioxin During Pregnancy Harms Offspring for Several Generations

New scientific research has demonstrated that exposure to dioxin, a common toxic chemical in industrial pollution, during pregnancy can harm the immune system of offspring and that this injury is passed along to subsequent generations, weakening the body’s defenses against infections such as the influenza virus. Exposure to dioxin in pregnancy occurs primarily in the food humans eat.

Elevated Levels of Cancer-Causing Chemicals in Nail Salons: Study

A new study has replicated previous findings demonstrating there are toxic levels of carcinogenic chemicals in nail salons and in some cases the toxic levels can be higher than those found in auto garages and oil refineries. The study examined levels of chemicals known as volatile organic compounds (VOCs) inside the air of nail salons. More specifically, the chemicals that are commonly found in nail products (benzene, formaldehyde, ethylbenzene, xylene and toulene) were measured inside of several nail salons. The study then went a step further and linked the presence of toxic chemicals in salons with self-reported adverse health symptoms of salon workers.

Chemicals in Sunscreen Seep into Your Bloodstream: FDA Study

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has just published the results of a pilot study conducted by FDA scientists in the Journal of American Medical Association’s JAMA Network that demonstrated four chemicals commonly used in commercial sunscreens seep into the bloodstream after just one day of use.