The Problem with Lead

Problems with lead exposure in the U.S. are far more pervasive and far closer to home than many might think–namely, in the food we eat (leaching from food packaging containers), in cosmetics like lipstick, and lead in bottled water bought at the supermarket.  But the other problem with lead–why it still exists in our food, cosmetics and water–is a political one.  A group of organizations has recently sent a formal petition to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) urging the agency to revise its outdated standards for lead in food to better protect the public.

More Pesticides Detected in Honey

You may recall that scientific testing has previously detected glyphosate, the primary active ingredient in RoundUp weedkiller, in honey.  Now, new testing methods have revealed yet another commonly used insecticide present in honey: Pyrethroids.  Neurotoxic pyrethroids are one of two main groups of pesticides that contribute to colony collapse disorder in bees.

Neurotoxic Flea Treatment for Pets Contaminating Water

Scientists have recently discovered that pesticides commonly used as flea treatments for pets are contaminating rivers. The new research reveals widespread contamination, with two neurotoxic pesticides found in concentrations that far exceed accepted safe limits.  More specifically, researchers have found widespread contamination of rivers with two neurotoxic pesticides commonly used in veterinary flea products: fipronil and the neonicotinoid imidacloprid. 

Neurological Disorders Significantly Linked with Chemicals in Air Pollution

The results from a long-term study revealed a significant link between air pollution and an increased risk of hospital admissions for several neurological disorders, including Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease, and other dementia-related conditions.

Endocrine-Disrupting Chemicals: Health Threat Grows

After reviewing hundreds of peer-reviewed scientific studies researches have concluded that a growing number of chemicals in pesticides, flame retardants, and certain plastics have been linked to widespread health problems including infertility, diabetes, and impaired brain development.  Exposure to certain chemicals found in industrial and household goods has also been linked in new studies to obesity; to endometriosis, a painful and abnormal growth of tissue on the outside of the womb; and to polycystic ovary syndrome, a significant cause of infertility.

Biggest Chemical Threat to Intellectual Disability: Flame Retardants, Pesticides

A new scientific study just released examined the extent of IQ loss linked to toxic chemicals over a 15 year period in the U.S.  Flame retardants and pesticides, and to a lesser extent, heavy metals like lead, resulted in more than a million cases of intellectual disability in the United States between 2001 and 2016. As a result of significantly fewer restrictions, flame retardants and pesticides now represent the bulk of that cognitive loss.

Maine becomes first US state to ban Styrofoam

Styrofoam containers are harmful to humans, animals and the environment. Scientific research has demonstrated that the toxic chemicals (Benzene and Styrene) in Styrofoam (polystyrene) leach into our food (this is especially true with hot drinks and foods and red wine) where they act as neurotoxins adversely affecting the brain and nervous system. Additionally, Styrofoam cannot be recycled and is accumulating in landfills where it breaks down leaving its toxic chemicals to harm wildlife, marine life and the environment.

Now one state has decided to take action to reduce the amount of Styrofoam on the planet. Maine has just become the first U.S. state to officially ban Styrofoam containers outright.