Toxic Furniture and Industry Lies: Doc Recommendation

Fire retardant chemicals (also known as PBDEs) are released when humans and pets sit on furniture that contains them; they are toxic, volatile and travel widely into the air. These toxic chemicals have been linked to numerous serious health problems, including cancer. There is no scientific evidence in peer-reviewed journals that confirm these fire retardants in our sofas, beds and chairs really slow fires down enough to save lives.  These chemicals present significant risks to human health and well-being so if they do not definitively slow or retard fires, then why are they in our furniture? The HBO documentary ‘Toxic Hot Seat’ exposes the nexus of money, politics and power behind the answer.

Biggest Chemical Threat to Intellectual Disability: Flame Retardants, Pesticides

A new scientific study just released examined the extent of IQ loss linked to toxic chemicals over a 15 year period in the U.S.  Flame retardants and pesticides, and to a lesser extent, heavy metals like lead, resulted in more than a million cases of intellectual disability in the United States between 2001 and 2016. As a result of significantly fewer restrictions, flame retardants and pesticides now represent the bulk of that cognitive loss.

Exposure to PBDE in the Womb Linked to Lifelong Metabolic Disorder

The effects of the common flame retardant PBDE (present in everything from baby pajamas to plastics and furniture) may be both serious and potentially lifelong for unborn children.  A new scientific study has revealed that when mothers-to-be are exposed to the chemical during pregnancy their unborn children are also exposed (via the umbilical cord and later, breast milk) and that this perinatal exposure to PBDE is linked with a lifelong metabolic disorder affecting the liver of the unborn child throughout life making them vulnerable to insulin resistance and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

Researchers Link So-called ‘Safer Alternative’ Household Chemical to Infertility

In the first of a kind study examining how common household chemicals called “PFRs” may affect reproductive health, researchers discovered … More