Pregnant Mothers, a Common Chemical, and Fat Offspring: New Study Makes a Connection

A new study just released examined the potential link between the chemical commonly used as an antibacterial in soaps and lotions, and overweight kids.  The offending chemical is triclocarban (TCC); it is an endocrine-disrupting chemical which means it messes with human hormones.

The study, conducted by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory scientists, demonstrated that exposure to environmental levels of triclocarban (TCC), an antibacterial chemical common in personal care products like soaps and lotions, including those used by the medical field (such as in hospitals), can transfer from mother to offspring and interfere with lipid metabolism.

This study represents the first report to quantify the transfer of an environmentally relevant concentration of the chemical TCC from mother to offspring.

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“We demonstrated that TCC does effectively transfer from mother to offspring, both trans-placentally and via lactation. Exposure to TCC during development may pose a serious health risk to the developing embryo and fetus, as they are more sensitive to alterations in hormone levels, which may result in changes that often are irreversible.”

-Dr. Heather Enright, biologist Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the study’s lead researcher

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What are ‘lipids’?

Lipids are naturally occurring molecules that include fats, waxes, fat-soluble vitamins, monoglycerides, diglycerides, triglycerides and others.

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What do lipids do, exactly?

The main biological function of lipids is storing energy and signaling, and acting as structural components of cell membranes.

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What do the results mean in real life?

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“Early life exposure to TCC has the potential to cause irreversible outcomes due to the fragile nature of organ systems and protective mechanisms in developing offspring.”

-Dr. Heather Enright, biologist Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the study’s lead researcher

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Exposure to TCC during pregnancy can mean heavier babies/children

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TCC-related compounds were detected in the tissues of offspring with significantly higher concentrations in the brain, heart and fat. In addition to the transfer from mother to offspring, exposed offspring were heavier in weight than unexposed mice — demonstrating an 11 percent and 8.5 percent increase in body weight for females and males, respectively.


 

Journal Reference:  Heather A. Enright, Miranda J. S. Falso, Michael A. Malfatti, Victoria Lao, Edward A. Kuhn, Nicholas Hum, Yilan Shi, Ana Paula Sales, Kurt W. Haack, Kristen S. Kulp, Bruce A. Buchholz, Gabriela G. Loots, Graham Bench, Kenneth W. Turteltaub. Maternal exposure to an environmentally relevant dose of triclocarban results in perinatal exposure and potential alterations in offspring development in the mouse model. PLOS ONE, August 2017

DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0181996

Source


 

triclosan-triclocarban warnings from scientists

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Solutions:  Pregnant women should carefully read the ingredients on all products prior to purchase/use. Avoid all products that include triclocarban (TCC) or triclosan. Whenever possible use certified organic products or make your own personal care products using fresh ingredients.