Chemical Additives in Processed Food Cross the Placenta, Damage Babies’ Immune System, say scientists

A new warning from scientists about food additives: Billions of nanoparticle food additives can reach infants, even crossing the placenta during pregnancy. These chemical food additives can change the baby’s gut microbiome and damage gut cells. This phenomenon, researchers believe, likely raises allergy and immune disorder risk.

Stopping Toxic Chemicals in Food: GAO Recommends FDA Appeals to Congress

Scientific laboratory testing has demonstrated that food and food packaging in the U.S. contains toxic chemicals/additives. Yet the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) lacks the legal power to compel food manufacturers to provide information to the FDA so they can review the level of public health risks of the chemicals in question (like PFAS and BPA in food packaging that migrates into the food).  Now, the U.S. Government Accountability Office (GAO) has conducted an investigation and created a report that has recommended that FDA request this authority from Congress.

Ban PFAS in Food Containers Bill vs PFAS Manufacturers and Big Chemical

The bipartisan bill known as “Keep Food Containers Safe from PFAS Act” is getting another chance among legislators with S.3169 – Keep Food Containers Safe from PFAS Act of 2021. The purpose of the legislation is to amend the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act to prohibit the introduction or delivery for introduction into interstate commerce of food packaging containing intentionally added PFAS chemicals.

States with New PFAS Laws

PFAS chemicals have among the strongest bonds in chemistry and at the present time there is no ‘death’ of these chemicals, meaning they do not break down over time, but appear they will live on “forever”.  PFAS chemicals are not regulated by the U.S. government so it is up to individual states to determine and regulate PFAS chemicals to protect their residents.  Many states are not addressing the PFAS problem, but some are. Here are some state laws being proposed or enacted to help protect state residents by at least minimizing exposure to the dangers of PFAS.